Different Types of Emails

Types of Emails

Employee. Employer. Job applicant. Businessman. Anybody. In this age of internet, email has become an integral part of almost, if not, everyone. I used to use email just to communicate with my relatives in other countries. I had my own personal email address @hotmail.com. When I transferred to work in a multinational electronics company, email became a part of my (work) life. We were all given our own email address and we used Outlook for emails. Though we used email at work, we can still check our work mails even outside the office. When I changed job and moved to a multinational engineering company, the set-up is just the same, except that we are using Lotus notes this time.

There are also love stories that formed and blossomed through emails. Remember the movie You’ve Got Mail, starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan? There are also some who landed on their dream jobs through email.

Our education system had also integrated email in the system. In some cases, the students may submit homework through email. The teachers can also make announcements via email.

In other countries, the use of email may be just for a few due to limited access to internet. But even if that is the case, the fact that email is a very important form of communication still remains, from a very simple greeting to a more complicated transactional email.

There are so many different kinds of emails, depending on the purpose, the manner in which it was sent, etc. In this regard, an email may sometimes fall to more than one type. Below are some of the common types of emails.

 

Marketing Emails

Marketing emails are informative, e.g., they may contain a portion of a book or a seminar that is being advertised in the body of the email. Examples of marketing emails are newsletters from various individuals and companies. Some marketing emails, as the word marketing suggests, are promotional in nature. The email is meant to promote the business. It could also be that the email is an invitation, but still part of the marketing strategy. The email is informing a client regarding an event and it may contain some details about the event and what the client may get from it.

Marketing emails are not personalized. It may be addressed to the client in the greeting portion but the content of the email is just the same as the one that is sent to all the other recipients. In other cases, marketing emails are sent as one to all the recipients, that is, even the greeting is not personalized. Hence, marketing emails are sometimes called bulk emails.

Marketing Emails

Notification Emails

Have you experienced sending an email to a person and you immediately got an auto response saying that the person you emailed is out of the office and will respond to you as soon as possible? Or if you used your email for your facebook account, have you experienced receiving emails notifying you of the activities happening in your facebook? From the word notification itself, notification emails give notice to the recipient of the email. Notification emails are usually automated. It can be done in the settings such that the automatic response is sent whenever the alarm is triggered. Another example of a notification email is a confirmation email, an email confirming that an event, i.e. a meeting perhaps, will push through.

Notification Emails

Transactional Emails

We are all aware now that gone are the days when everything is done physically. A lot of things now can be done via internet. We can purchase anything in the internet. So how about the receipts, invoices, etc? The origin of transaction emails can be linked to e-commerce. Receipts and emails are sent via emails. Those are examples of transaction emails. Say, you paid your bill via mobile banking. You will receive a notification email regarding your transaction, right? That notification email is also another example of transaction email. However, that was before. Transaction emails these days are no longer limited to just e-commerce. It can now be anything from e-commerce to web applications to social media and even to simple business emails within a company.

Most business emails fall under transaction emails. In an engineering company, for example, a sales engineer may send an email to somebody in the procurement team. Business-related emails among internal and external clients are also transactional emails. An application letter (for a job) can also be classified as a transactions email.

Transaction emails are triggered by a transaction. Hence, the main content of a transaction email is about the transaction that already took place, on-going transaction, or to initiate a transaction. Its main purpose is to facilitate or to provide an update about the transaction. It can also be one-to-one or one-to-many.

Transactional Emails

One-to- Many Emails

From the name itself, this type of email is sent to many by one sender. The origin of this type of email can be tied up to e-commerce when e-marketing started. This has become a way for businessmen to reach many people in a very limited cost and time. Example of this type of email is an invitation email that is sent to a large group. A very simple example would be a casual conversational email among friends. Some marketing emails also fall in this category.

One-to- Many Emails

Personal Emails

If you are an employee in a certain company, you probably have an email address in the company’s server. Also, most probably, you may have used your company email for some non-work related emails. Those non-work related emails, sent by using the company’s server, are examples of personal email. You may also have your own email like those at @gmail.com, @hotmail.com, @yahoo.com, and your emails sent and received via your own personal email are examples of personal emails.

The above are the most common types of emails. There are other emails like promotional emails, welcome emails, survey emails and among many other emails, but basically those emails fall under one or several of the email types described above.

Personal Emails

Advertisement

No comments.

Leave a Reply